Sunday, December 20, 2020

Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao, Inc. (UGAT)

UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO INC. (UGAT)


The Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao Inc. (UGAT), organized in early 1977 and registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission in 1979, is the national organization of anthropologists in the Philippines. It is also known as the Anthropological Association of the Philippines. UGAT’s main objectives are:

  • To promote, develop and disseminate anthropological knowledge;

  • To promote, deepen the knowledge, understanding and participation of and among different ethno-linguistic groups in working towards an integrated national consciousness and development;

  • To promote and forge linkages among anthropologists and others doing related work within the country and other parts of the world;

  • To uphold professional ethics.
Since its founding, UGAT has been conducting annual national conferences not only to discuss professional concerns but also to make anthropology more involved in national issues affecting Philippine society and culture.

UGAT is a regular member of the Philippine Social Science Council (PSSC) and is affiliated with the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES).

Journal Information

AGHAMTAO is the official publication of the Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao, Inc. (UGAT), the Anthropological Association of the Philippines.  Beginning with its maiden issue in 1978 devoted to a stocktaking of Anthropology in the Philippines, it continues to provide a forum for the “scholarship and the practice of anthropology,” covering such diverse areas as development and sustainability, disaster, ethnicity and national unity, education, and mass movements. The journal features selected papers read in annual conferences as well as reports from special events organized by UGAT.

AGHAMTAO comes out as a regular issue in October. All articles are screened by the Editorial Board, and undergo a double-blind review process. ​Issues of the journal are available at the PSSC Central Subscription Service.

Sunday, December 1, 2019

Jonathan C. Malicsi, University of the Philippines, Diliman

JONATHAN C. MALICSI 
Professor Emeritus
Department of Linguistics
University of the Philippines, Diliman

29 April 1947 - 01 December 2019


It is with a sad heart that we announce the passing of Professor Emeritus Jonathan Malicsi. He was supposed to give the final installment for the 2019 Philippine Indigenous Languages Lecture Series (PILLS), drawing from what he had learned from his major work among the Halitaq Baytan community.

Having served the University and the Department for more than half a century, Prof. Emeritus Malicsi had been the Department's Chair twice, Head of the President's Committee for Culture and the Arts (now OICA) for 17 years, first Convener of the Philippine Linguistics Congress, and a member of the first batch of the UP Madrigal Singers.

A sought-after expert in Philippine linguistics and Philippine culture studies, he had mentored and trained countless students and educators from agencies and institutions both in the Philippines and abroad. Not his ailment nor his blindness could have prevented him from delivering the lecture to impart his knowledge and his love for languages, as well as continuing to teach his regular graduate classes.

The Department of Linguistics is one with Prof. Emeritus Malicsi's colleagues, students, friends, and loved ones in paying tribute to one of the great Filipino linguists, who spent his whole life studying Philippine languages and teaching many more to carry on his work. Paalam at maraming salamat po, Doc M.

----------------------------------------------------
Prof. Emeritus Malicsi was  one of the founding members of UGAT in 1977.

----------------------------------------------------
Prof. Emeritus Malicsi's ashes will be at the Church of the Risen Lord, UP Diliman tomorrow (02 December 2019, Monday). Public viewing will start at 10:00PM.

Reference: https://www.facebook.com/UPLinguistics/photos/a.269624213090403/2837168333002632/

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Infringement issue or just plain lack of due diligence

A photo I took of Dr. Erlinda Burton on November 2017 at the 39th UGAT held at Capitol University, Cagayan de Oro was published at NCCA’s Agung Magazine (Volume XXI, Number 3, July-September 2018, page 70).


Apparently, the photo did not bear any credit.  Not a name of the photographer can be seen nor even a citation of the blogspot where this was first published.

I first posted this photo as part of "UGAT 39th Annual Conference - In Photos" on this blogspot on 08 November 2017. The post bear the name of the photographer.




The same photo also appeared in Aghamtao (Journal of the Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao, Inc. / UGAT, Volume 26, 2018, page 187, obituary section).  The photo in that journal bears the photographer's name.

I had already informed NCCA regarding this through a text message but will also be sending a formal email to NCCA Chair Virgilio Almario.

Friday, October 4, 2019

UGAT 41st Annual Conference Call for Participation

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO, INC. (UGAT)
Anthropological Association of the Philippines
and
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines


41st Annual Conference
FOOD (IN)SECURITY:
An International Conference on Anthropology of Food and Eating
07-09 November 2019
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

UGAT cordially invites you to its 41st Annual Conference at the Visayas State University in Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines on 07-09 November 2019. The conference theme is “food (in)security” where food and eating will be interrogated and unpacked in the context of local understandings vis-à-vis global processes in various human conditions and temporalities. While global processes shape and inform foodways and eating habits, anthropology pays attention to myriad and contested ways on how specific contexts understand, interpret and articulate the meanings of food and the practices of eating.

In addressing the theme, the conference offers two keynote addresses, five distinguished lectures, 120 paper presentations, film screening, and other activities. The UGAT conference aims to provide an arena for reflexive and critical discussions on food-related issues, and to foster meaningful and engaged discussions among practitioners of anthropology – whether in academe, development and cultural work, media, art, advocacy, policy and governance, community work, or other forms of social action.

Conference Convenors

Dr. Cynthia Neri-Zayas
Jessie G. Varquez, Jr.
Dr. Guiraldo C. Fernandez, Jr.

Conference Registration Fees

UGAT member (Php3,500) | non-UGAT member (Php4,500)

Undergraduate student (Php2,500) |Foreign participant (USD100)

To pay the Conference Registration Fee (CRF), please deposit the amount to “Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao, Inc.”, CA 393359300015 (Philippine National Bank-UP Campus) at any PNB Branch. If you wish to pay the CRF through PayPal, please contact Dr. Melvin Jabar (UGAT Treasurer) at melvin.jabar@dlsu.edu.ph. Kindly email the bank deposit slip to the UGAT Treasurer, as well as present the actual deposit slip during conference registration. Membership in the UGAT is not included in the Registration Fee. The annual membership fee is Php1,000 inclusive of a copy of the AghamTao journal. You may sign up for UGAT membership during the conference.

Conference Documents: Please access all conference-related documents (e.g., Travel and Accommodation, Conference Program, CHED Memo, etc.) here: http://bit.ly/2kjOu6Y.

Conference Preregistration: To avoid the hassle of onsite registration, you are strongly encouraged to preregister online at http://bit.ly/2YFdSpS. This form can only be accomplished if the CRF payment has already been made.

Important Advisory: The 41st UGAT Annual Conference is aiming to be plastic-free. Everyone is encouraged to bring their own water bottles and/or coffee tumblers.

For further information, please contact the head of the conference secretariat Ms. Annabelle Bonje at mobile number +63 915 547 7877 or email at ugat.conference@gmail.com. Please like and follow UGAT Facebook page for updates: https://www.facebook.com/ugat1978/.

Kindly forward this Call for Participation to your contacts and networks. See you in Baybay!

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Deadline of Payment for Reduced Conference Registration Fee

EXTENDED! The deadline of payment for reduced Conference Registration Fee is extended until 30 September 2019!


Join us at Visayas State Univeristy in Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines on November 07-09, 2019. Pre-register now to avail a reduced conference fee (until September 30) and avoid the hassle of on-site registration!

Details of the Conference Registration Fee are found here: bit.ly/2HrFLrI
To pre-register, please follow this link: bit.ly/2YFdSpS

Pre-Registration Form is open until 31 October 2019.

See you in Baybay!

Reference: https://www.facebook.com/ugat1978/photos/a.728986934224815/766351863821655/?type=3&theater

Monday, August 26, 2019

E. Arsenio Manuel Best Student Paper Award

E. ARSENIO MANUEL BEST STUDENT PAPER AWARD

41st Annual Conference
UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO, INC. (UGAT)
Anthropological Association of the Philippines
07-09 November 2019
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines



ELIGIBILITY

Accepted paper submissions from students (enrolled undergraduate or graduate students at the time of the conference) are eligible to participate in the E. Arsenio Manuel Best Student Paper Award. The author(s) must indicate in the Abstract Submission Form that they intend to participate in the competition. The competing papers must also be orally presented during the conference.

FORMAT

Document: A4 paper size, 1-inch margin on all sides, TNR 12, 1.5 space
Content: Title, Abstract, Keywords, Body, References (Aghamtao citation style)
Length: minimum of 3,000 words, maximum of 5,000 words
Author identification: on a cover page, indicate the full name(s) of the author(s), contact details (email and mobile), institutional affiliation, and degree program; do not indicate author(s)’s name in the paper

SUBMISSION

File: name the doc file as "(last name of author)_StudentPaper_UGAT2019" - e.g., Cruz_StudentPaper_UGAT2019 (if multiple authors, indicate first author only)
Email: send the paper as doc file (not pdf) to ugat.conference@gmail.com using the file name of the doc file as the subject
Due: 31 October 2019

AWARD

Submissions will be duly notified. A board of judges will evaluate all submissions. The award will be given during the Closing Ceremony of the 41st UGAT Annual Conference. Aside from a certificate, the winning paper will also be automatically accepted (subject to the editorial process) for the next issue of Aghamtao, the official journal publication of UGAT.

E. Arsenio Manuel sketch by Angeli Marie G. Narvaez for Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino 

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

UGAT 41st Annual Conference: Keynote Address

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Mythologies, Rebellions, and Hopes: The Indigenous Lumad's Struggle for Self-determination

Prof. Sarah Raymundo 
University of the Philippines, Diliman


The struggle for self-determination of Indigenous Peoples (IP) in the Philippines persists in the face of continued attacks on their rights. In the age of agribusiness, farm-to-market roads, malls, and increased environmental risks, the views of children who are bound to inherit the struggle of their ancestors for ancestral domain are worth documenting and analyzing. In particular, how school children describe how development looks like may not only be indicative of the current conduct of IP struggle. Its very documentation and discussion are persistent in an anthropological project which has made the discipline more inclined than others in the Social Sciences to unpack the "myths' which have been suppressed by colonialism and neoliberalism. Asked how a good life looks like, a group of Lumad school children agreed on a concrete vision: "When our parents no longer need to go to the city and buy our food from the grocery, we know life is good." This is in stark contrast to how most people perceive a good life shaped by a cash economy. Through qualitative research methods, this study aims to put forward the suppressed myths about the IP's construction of the good life. This study mainly argues that recognizing these "myths" as presence in our lives, research projects, and institutions is constitutive of a necessary critique of our monopolized market system and a compelling invitation to conspire with these myths long suppressed to make food sovereignty and respect for ancestral domain sound nothing more than just "myths."

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sarah Raymundo teaches at and directs the University of the Philippines-Diliman Center for International Studies. She is engaged in activist work in BAYAN (The New Patriotic Alliance), the International League of Peoples' Struggles. She leads the Committee for International Affairs of the Alliance of Concerned Teachers. She is the Chairperson of the Philippines-Bolivarian Venezuela Friendship Association. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal for Labor and Society (LANDS) and Interface: Journal of/and for Social Movements.


UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO, INC. (UGAT)
Anthropological Association of the Philippines and
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

41st Annual Conference
FOOD (IN)SECURITY: An International Conference on Anthropology of Food and Eating
07-09 November 2019
Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

Sunday, July 21, 2019

UGAT 41st Annual Conference: Keynote Address

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Of Forests and Gods: the biopolitics of (un)making life and livelihood in the Philippine uplands

Dr. Wolfram Dressler
University of Melbourne



Acts of governing upland peoples and landscapes increasingly reflect biopolitical endeavours in the frontiers of Southeast Asia - endeavours that aim to enhance and optimise the possibility of life. Beyond state schemes, actors in civil society fixate on the uplands to govern and discipline indigenous peoples' bodies, beliefs and behaviours in the service of outsider aims. Today, indigenous uplanders negotiate an increasing number of non-state governance practices that aim to reform life and livelihood through sustained discursive and material disciplining. Bridging Foucauldian biopolitics and material studies, in this talk I describe how the intersection of NGO and missionary practices strive to optimise upland life in contrasting yet reinforcing ways by reordering the livelihood practices and food choices of Pala'wan uplanders towards 'modern' ideals and existence. In doing so, I explore how NGOs reify Pala'wan custom and tradition to optimise livelihoods and food preferences for forest conservation, and how Seventh Day Adventists prohibit certain myths, rituals, and associated (customary) foods for locally situated proselytization. I describe how these actors' efforts to condition and discipline Pala'wan bodies, behaviours and diets powerfully intersect, reforming how uplanders reproduce themselves over time and space. I conclude by asserting that indigenous sovereignty over life and livelihood matters now more than ever as biopolitical interventions intensify and manifest in the uplands.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dr. Wolfram Dressler is an Associate Professor at the University of Melbourne. He works at the intersectionof anthropology, political ecology and agrarian change in Southeast Asia and the Philippines in particular.


UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO, INC. (UGAT)
Anthropological Association of the Philippines and
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

41st Annual Conference
FOOD (IN)SECURITY: An International Conference on Anthropology of Food and Eating
07-09 November 2019
Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

UGAT Membership

Interested to be a member of UGAT ? 

As per Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao, Inc. (UGAT) Constitution and By-laws, interested individuals can become regular members of UGAT. Regular members are those who:

  • Have earned a degree (Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy) in Anthropology, or
  • Are deemed acceptable by the committee on membership by reason of some special contribution to anthropology, anthropological research or the promotion of anthropological activities.

Any person eligible for and desiring admission to membership can take the following steps:

  • Write a letter of interest addressed to the Committee on Membership,
  • Fill in the application form and email it to the UGAT Secretary of the Board (this 2019, nmagno@ateneo.edu).
  • Pay the membership fee of P1,000.00 by depositing to this account:

Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao, Inc. (UGAT)
PNB Checking Account: 108 670 007 171
UP Campus Branch
3 Apacible St., UP Campus
Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines

  • Write your name on the deposit slip and send an image of the deposit slip to the UGAT Treasurer (this 2019, melvin.jabar@dlsu.edu.ph)

You will receive confirmation and a certificate of membership. Membership is valid for one year upon payment of the annual membership fee.If you apply now, you will become a member of UGAT for the term of November 2018 to October 2019.

Your membership entitles you to a free copy of the Aghamtao journal, which you can claim during the conference. It also entitles you to a discount on your registration fee for the conference.
Members also have certain duties to fulfill:

  • contribute to the attainment of the goals of UGAT;
  • attend annual meetings/conferences;
  • pay the annual dues;
  • elect the members of the Board of Directors;
  • abide by the Code of Ethics; and,
  • perform other duties as the General Assembly may decide for implementation.

Thank you for expressing interest in becoming a member of the Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao (UGAT). We hope to see you this year in the UGAT Conference 2019 at Visayas State University in Baybay, Leyte.

Reference: https://www.facebook.com/notes/ugnayang-pang-aghamtao-ugat/ugat-membership/721776121612563/

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

UGAT 41st Annual Conference - Final Call for Papers

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS

UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO, INC. (UGAT)
Anthropological Association of the Philippines
and
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines


41st Annual Conference
FOOD (IN)SECURITY:
An International Conference on Anthropology of Food and Eating
07-09 November 2019
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

Food is an essential means of sustaining human life. Yet despite massive efforts on technological and scientific innovations in intensifying and improving food production and distribution on a global scale, food-related issues such as hunger and famine still beset ‘local’ communities. This precarity is further exacerbated by interlocking issues such as environmental degradation (e.g., massive biodiversity loss), disasters caused by climate change (e.g., prolonged droughts and strong typhoons), weak political institutions (e.g., food aid failures), unsound economic policies (e.g., food prices impact on family hunger), and social inequality, among others. As a consequence, the emergence of counterculture mass movements due to food (in)security, such as slow food movement, locavorism, vegetarianism and veganism, among others, is becoming popular and powerful, irrespective of national boundaries and identities.

There is thus a need to reexamine and rethink how food is produced, circulated, and consumed. Food and eating has to be interrogated and unpacked in the context of local understandings vis-à-vis global processes in various human conditions and temporalities. While global processes shape and inform foodways and eating habits, anthropology pays attention to myriad and contested ways on how specific contexts understand, interpret and articulate the meanings of food and the practices of eating.

This year’s UGAT Annual Conference organizers are accepting papers, panels, and short film/video proposals that consider ‘security’, or lack thereof, as the key frame in understanding themes and issues concerning food and eating. The UGAT conference aims to provide an arena for reflexive and critical discussions on food-related issues, and to foster meaningful and engaged discussions among practitioners of anthropology – whether in academe, development and cultural work, media, art, advocacy, policy and governance, community work, or other forms of social action.

Proposals are welcome to address any of the following topics:

  • Global Issues -- authenticity (food identities, heritage, heirloom veggies, agricultural tourism, tourism and gastronomy; security and hunger (insecurity and internal displacement, food sovereignty, impact of climate on food and nutrition, sustainability)
  • Ethnographies -- Production (bayanihan farming, innabuyog, fishing, hunting, farming, subsistence vs surplus, seasonality, material culture in preparation, distribution and consumption); Processing(boiling, gata, sugab, kilaw, seasoning (Japanese dashi), kakanin); Distribution(tabu, tiangge, palengke, supermarket, hypermarket, food sharing, gift-giving); Consumption (sociality, manners, food etiquette, structure of the meal, feasting, fasting & famine)
  • Economy and Environment -- food trade, trade wars, multinational corporations, plantation economy and agribusiness, food and agriculture, farming systems, livestock, food and the sea; environmental decline, biodiversity loss; more-than-human anthropology (human-animal, human-plant relationships), producing non-food cash crops, overharvesting, genetically-engineered food and transgenics
  • Indigenous and Local Knowledge Systems and Practices -- ethnobiology, ethnoscience, endemic food; recipe studies (historical, contemporary, cross-cultural, regional, importance of place)
  • Health, Medicine, Nutrition, Food Safety -- diets and fads, child overweight and adult obesity, food as medicine, hidden hunger and malnutrition; hygiene, food science, food education, fake food
  • Eating Ideologies and Practices -- organics, vegetarianism, veganism, locavorism, culinary triangle (raw, cooked, rotten), fast food vs slow food, food fallacies, food rituals, food taboos; food and gender: body image, gender roles, gender stratification through food and eating
  • Archaeology of Food -- ancient diet, reconstructing diet from human remains, material culture, hunger and famine in archaeological contexts, food cultures in prehistoric societies
  • Aesthetics and Sensibilities -- food as art, culinary art; food tourism and gastronomy; prestige food and pride of place, food memories
  • Food Rights -- geopolitics, governance and regulation, development goals, land grabbing, displacement, land conversion, dispossession, access to food, household intake and urban poor, food policies
  • Communication, Media, Folklore, History -- the language of food; food metaphors; navigating the internet: food porn, emojis, and social media; literature on food, food documentaries and histories
  • Non-food Food -- food for the soul, forgetting hunger, pantawid gutom, metaphorical food

Proposals that do not fall under any of the identified topics above will be given consideration.

CONFERENCE CONVENORS

Cynthia N. Zayas (University of the Philippines, Diliman)
Jessie G. Varquez, Jr. (De La Salle University - Manila)
Guiraldo C. Fernandez, Jr. (Visayas State University) 

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
  • Submissions must use the prescribed Submission Form (http://bit.ly/2Go1AZ7) which includes an abstract (250 words) written in a style that is accessible to non-academic audiences.
  • Proposals for panels must include a panel abstract as well as paper abstracts (see second page of the Submission Form).
  • Proposals written in Waray, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, and Filipino are accepted. 
  • Kindly email the completely filled-out Submission Form (in pdf) to ugat.conference@gmail.com
Deadline:  15 August 2019

Notice of acceptance of proposals will be issued by email by September 2019.

For further information, please contact the head of the conference secretariat Ms Annabelle Bonje (+63 915 547 7877) or at ugat.conference@gmail.com

To learn more about our conference venue, you can check the webpage of Visayas State University at https://www.vsu.edu.ph

Please like our UGAT page on FB for updates https://www.facebook.com/ugat1978/

Monday, April 15, 2019

UGAT 41st Annual Conference Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

UGNAYANG PANG-AGHAMTAO, INC. (UGAT)
Anthropological Association of the Philippines
and
Visayas State University, Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines


41st Annual Conference
FOOD (IN)SECURITY:
An International Conference on Anthropology of Food and Eating
07-09 November 2019
Baybay City, Leyte, Philippines

Food is an essential means of sustaining human life. Yet despite massive efforts on technological and scientific innovations in intensifying and improving food production and distribution on a global scale, food-related issues such as hunger and famine still beset ‘local’ communities. This precarity is further exacerbated by interlocking issues such as environmental degradation (e.g., massive biodiversity loss), disasters caused by climate change (e.g., prolonged droughts and strong typhoons), weak political institutions (e.g., food aid failures), unsound economic policies (e.g., food prices impact on family hunger), and social inequality, among others. As a consequence, the emergence of counterculture mass movements due to food (in)security, such as slow food movement, locavorism, vegetarianism and veganism, among others, is becoming popular and powerful, irrespective of national boundaries and identities. 

There is thus a need to reexamine and rethink how food is produced, circulated, and consumed. Food and eating has to be interrogated and unpacked in the context of local understandings vis-à-vis global processes in various human conditions and temporalities. While global processes shape and inform foodways and eating habits, anthropology pays attention to myriad and contested ways on how specific contexts understand, interpret and articulate the meanings of food and the practices of eating.

This year’s UGAT Annual Conference organizers are accepting papers, panels, and short film/video proposals that consider ‘security’, or lack thereof, as the key frame in understanding themes and issues concerning food and eating. The UGAT conference aims to provide an arena for reflexive and critical discussions on food-related issues, and to foster meaningful and engaged discussions among practitioners of anthropology – whether in academe, development and cultural work, media, art, advocacy, policy and governance, community work, or other forms of social action.

Proposals are welcome to address any of the following topics:
  • Global Issues -- authenticity (food identities, heritage, heirloom veggies, agricultural tourism, tourism and gastronomy; security and hunger (insecurity and internal displacement, food sovereignty, impact of climate on food and nutrition, sustainability)
  • Ethnographies -- Production (bayanihan farming, innabuyog, fishing, hunting, farming, subsistence vs surplus, seasonality, material culture in preparation, distribution and consumption); Processing (boiling, gata, sugab, kilaw, seasoning (Japanese dashi), kakanin); Distribution (tabu, tiangge, palengke, supermarket, hypermarket, food sharing, gift-giving); Consumption (sociality, manners, food etiquette, structure of the meal, feasting, fasting and famine)
  • Economy and Environment -- food trade, trade wars, multinational corporations, plantation economy and agribusiness, food and agriculture, farming systems, livestock, food and the sea; environmental decline, biodiversity loss; more-than-human anthropology (human-animal, human-plant relationships), producing non-food cash crops, over-harvesting, genetically-engineered food and transgenics
  • Indigenous and Local Knowledge Systems and Practices -- ethnobiology, ethnoscience, endemic food; recipe studies (historical, contemporary, cross-cultural, regional, importance of place)
  • Health, Medicine, Nutrition, Food Safety -- diets and fads, child overweight and adult obesity, food as medicine, hidden hunger and malnutrition; hygiene, food science, food education, fake food
  • Eating Ideologies and Practices -- organics, vegetarianism, veganism, locavorism, culinary triangle (raw, cooked, rotten), fast food vs slow food, food fallacies, food rituals, food taboos; food and gender: body image, gender roles, gender stratification through food and eating
  • Archaeology of Food - ancient diet, reconstructing diet from human remains, material culture, hunger and famine in archaeological contexts, food cultures in prehistoric societies
  • Aesthetics and Sensibilities -- food as art, culinary art; food tourism and gastronomy; prestige food and pride of place, food memories
  • Food Rights -- geopolitics, governance and regulation, development goals, land grabbing, displacement, land conversion, dispossession, access to food, household intake and urban poor, food policies
  • Communication, Media, Folklore, History -- the language of food; food metaphors; navigating the internet: food porn, emojis, and social media; literature on food, food documentaries and histories
  • Non-food Food -- food for the soul, forgetting hunger, pantawid gutom, metaphorical food 
Proposals that do not fall under any of the identified topics above will be given consideration.

CONFERENCE CONVENORS

Cynthia N. Zayas (University of the Philippines, Diliman)
Jessie G. Varquez, Jr. (De La Salle University - Manila)
Guiraldo C. Fernandez, Jr. (Visayas State University)

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES
  • Submissions must use the prescribed Submission Form (http://bit.ly/2Go1AZ7) which includes an abstract (250 words) written in a style that is accessible to non-academic audiences.
  • Proposals for panels must include a panel abstract as well as paper abstracts (see second page of the Submission Form).
  • Proposals written in Waray, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, and Filipino are accepted. 
  • Kindly email the completely filled-out Submission Form (in pdf) to ugat.conference@gmail.com
Deadline:  01 July 2019

Notice of acceptance of proposals will be issued by email by August 2019.

For further information, please contact the head of the conference secretariat Ms Annabelle Bonje (+63 915 547 7877) or at ugat.conference@gmail.com

To learn more about our conference venue, you can check the webpage of Visayas State University at https://www.vsu.edu.ph

Please like our UGAT page on FB for updates: https://www.facebook.com/ugat1978/

Monday, March 4, 2019

Aghamtao 28 - Call for Submissions


AGHAMTAO, the official peer-reviewed journal of the Ugnayang Pang-Aghamtao (UGAT/Anthropological Association of the Philippines), is now accepting submissions for Volume 28. The special issue will have the theme: “Our Interconnectedness: Doing anthropology in a time of ecological crisis.” The Issue Editors are particularly interested in papers that investigate the social conditions permeating today’s ecological crises, which threaten entire species and ways of life. The editors also invite full versions of papers presented at the 2018 UGAT conference with the same theme, or essays that engage with ideas that were tackled at the conference.

Please email Author Submission Form (in .pdf format) and article submission/s as separate file (in MS Word .doc format), to aghamtaojournal@gmail.com with cc to pperez@feu.edu.ph and eizelhilario@gmail.com following the submission guidelines listed below. To allow for the peer review process, the closing date for the themed issue is: June 30, 2019. Articles that are received beyond this date are still welcome but may be considered for succeeding issues of the journal.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

• Accomplish the Author Submission Form.
• Article submissions must be in MS Word .doc format
    - Minimum length: 3,000 words.
    - Must have an abstract of not more than 250 words.
    - Text format: Times New Roman, font size 12pts, double-spaced.
    - For referencing style, kindly consult recent issues of AGHAMTAO.
    - Please remove author name/s, and identifying information about the author/s. These details should only be in the Author Submission Form.
• Figures (numbered and with captions) should be in a separate file.

Download forms here:

Aghamtao 28 - Call for Submissions
Aghamtao Author Submission Form


Sunday, December 16, 2018

UGAT Christmas Reunion 2018 - In Photos

UGAT CHRISTMAS REUNION 2018
16 December 2018

University of the Philippines - Diliman
Diliman, Quezon City

IN PHOTOS


  UGAT Generations - founders, pioneers, movers, and the current Board of Directors

   Raul Pertierra / Pons Bennagen

   Carol Sobritchea / Lerma de Lima-Yambot

   Eugenia Bennagen / Jaja Paulate /  Che Dominguez 

   Len Regpala / Mercy Fabros

   Che Dominguez / Jaja Paulate 

   Etoy Castro / Fras Abaya / Maria Mangahas 

   Maria Mangahas / Ike Oracion 

   Etoy Castro / Maria Mangahas 

   Len Regpala 


   Mercy Fabros 


   Jaja Paulate


   Etoy Castro


   Suyen Roldan / Pons Bennagen

  Suyen Roldan / Carol Sobritchea

  Suyen Roldan / Raul Pertierra 

  Leah Vidal


UGAT Board of Directors 2018-2019


All photographs by Anthony John R. Balisi

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Palawan’s (un)sustainable development

SECOND OPINION: Palawan’s (un)sustainable development
Philippine Daily Inquirer
22 November 2018

Gideon Lasco 
Columnist 

PUERTO PRINCESA — Having lived in Palawan for over a year and having come and gone over the past decade, I can attest to its natural beauty: from the spellbinding forests of Cleopatra’s Needle and Mount Mantalingahan to the stunning beaches of El Nido and Coron. Even while walking along Puerto Princesa’s acacia-lined streets, one cannot help but be charmed by the island’s relatively pristine state.

This beauty, however, is facing numerous threats, a fact raised by President Duterte — who visited recently. Calling the island’s attractions a “crown jewel,” he told Palawan officials: “Itong (lugar) ninyo, linisin ninyo. Huwag ninyong overload. Bantay kayo d’yan. (Clean up your place, don’t overload it. Guard it.)” He also called on the officials not to allow hotels to be built near beaches, and warned that “nobody can claim ownership” of the island’s coastlines.

While the President was being feted by local politicians, scholars were likewise discussing the environmental state of Palawan, in the annual conference of the Ugnayang Agham-Tao (Ugat) — the association of Philippine anthropologists. Held at the Palawan State University (PSU), its theme could not have been more apt: “Doing Anthropology in Times of Environmental Crisis.” Among the issues raised were the impact of environmental changes (and laws) on indigenous peoples and the accommodation of mining projects by moving Environmentally Critical Areas Network  zones.

Doubtless, many Palaweños have benefited from economic growth: PSU graduates are choosing to stay in Puerto Princesa, where the growing tourism and service sectors have opened up more career opportunities; or elsewhere on the island, with mining and other industries. The city’s amenities, meanwhile, have made it a more attractive place for professionals to settle in or retire.

But there are also questions about the price of this so-called “development.” With its population tripling over the past 25 years, Puerto Princesa is showing signs of urban congestion, from burgeoning informal settlements and worsening traffic to recurring power outages and rising cost of living. “The city is losing its character,” one of my friends laments, referencing the trees, now gone, that used to be part of the landscape. “Soon we will look like any other Philippine city.”

As the elections draw near, I would like to challenge Palawan’s local officials to put environmental conversation and long-term planning at the heart of their policies and programs. Alas, the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development has lacked the political support to implement its mandate, and local officials have been slow to act on environmental concerns.

For his part, President Duterte speaks of the need to protect Palawan, but he must realize that significant threats to the province include the island-building in Kalayaan and the illegal poaching by Chinese fishermen in the West Philippine Sea. Thus, in light of his subservience to China, he must also direct his challenge to himself. Moreover, given the potentially grave environmental consequences of dividing Palawan into three provinces, I urge him not to sign this move — which reeks of gerrymandering — into law.

As for my friends in Palawan and all Palaweños, I know it is too much to ask them to follow the footsteps of the late Dr. Gerry Ortega, whose murder in broad daylight is a continuing reminder of the risks involved in activism. But supporting environmental organizations, patronizing sustainable tourism initiatives, and voting for officials who genuinely have the island’s interest in mind can all make a big difference. So can academic work that affirms, to borrow from the Ugat conference theme, “our interconnectedness” with nature and documents the threats to our shared fate.

It is time to arrest Palawan’s unsustainable development before it’s too late to undo the damage wrought by human greed and irresponsibility—not to mention political complicity and neglect. Indeed, whether we are leaders, citizens, scholars or friends of Palawan, the legacy we should strive for is not that that we “developed” the island—but that we left it as beautiful as it once was.

Follow @gideonlasco on Twitter. Send feedback to glasco@inquirer.com.ph.


Reference: https://opinion.inquirer.net/117639/palawans-unsustainable-development

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Anthropology majors lack support, funds for field school



No funding nor assistance and not a word of support from their own department—for anthropology undergraduates, these have been the recent struggles they face trying to finish their field school.

Yearly, students head to a pre-selected site selected by the Department of Anthropology which is based in the College of Social Sciences and Philosophy (CSSP).The activity, which is held in the mid-year semester before students graduate, has anthropology undergraduates produce reports of their communities through interviews and observations on the site.

Students are expected to shell out money for whatever expenses come up during their visit, while these costs typically hover around P10,000, said Edwin Valientes, this year's field school director for Mahatao, Batanes. These expenditures, meanwhile, include fees for accommodations, meals, and, in some instances, plane tickets for domestic or, sometimes even, travel abroad.

Raising money for the requirement usually involves much effort for students: holding income-generating projects, securing corporate sponsorships, grants, solicitations, and student cash-outs are just some of the options undergraduates count on to get by. But even with all the trouble, often these efforts can still come up short. Last year’s batch of field school participants, for example, held various projects over the course of eight months. The money those same projects earned, however, remained inadequate in funding their Batangas field school. This year’s batch of field schools in Mahatao and Pasig, similarly, found themselves still in need of money even after raising as much as P200,000.

Covering these fees without support was difficult, recalled Frances Sajor who went to the 2018 field school.

"The expenses had actually become heavy to the point that one of my classmates had to borrow money to attend the field school," Sajor recalled.

Forced Independence

Part of the struggle to raise money stems from the department not providing students with enough information to estimate their expenses on-site, remarked Kate Purnell, who spearheaded the fundraising projects for her batch.

“I really feel like things would have been easier if the department cared more about the welfare of its students,” she said, “Sabi nila ‘[kayong mga estudyante] na bahala mag-isip.’”

On the other hand, while some faculty members would buy the items students sell, the department as a unit does not offer any support, recalled 2017 batch head Dana Castillo.

Some students bound for field school last year, however, were able to secure P100,000 in reimbursements from the Office of the Chancellor after contacting corporations and non-government organizations had failed to yield results. Participants received the reimbursements later on after completing their field school. Castillo emphasized, however, that such cases are not typical.

The department should not be expected to subsidize the field school's fees as it is a course requirement, while students are oriented months before the activity itself, said Dr. Monica Santos, the director for this year’s field school in Pasig. Instances of reimbursements, on the other hand, also depend on the department’s budget for the field school director, while it is also ultimately the director’s prerogative whether to provide funding or not, Santos noted.

“It’s like kapag nag-prescribe kami ng textbook sa klase, hindi kami ang nagbibigay ng textbook for you. Hindi namin i-susubsidize ‘yun for you...in the case of the field school, it’s something that is part of the curriculum so it’s really something that you have to consider,” Santos remarked.

On the other hand, she also emphasized that the undergraduates’ expenses ultimately depend on their lifestyle. “Kung gusto mong mag-Starbucks araw-araw, eh aabot talaga sa trenta mil gagastusin mo.”

Stalemate

Paolo Sevilla, finance officer for this year’s field school, was critical of the administration’s stance.

“We choose how much to spend, but certain things are non-negotiable expenses that are almost binary in that they are either there or absent. This includes [the] cost of basic food, basic lodging, and transport to a field site that is not of our choosing.”

Though the administration has met with departments which hold field schools to discuss their needs, the university has no concrete plans to address the fees incurred by the activity. For now, students can request assistance through grant applications on campus, though support is not always guaranteed, said Madilene Landicho, who was a field school director last year.

Amid anthropology majors’ field school woes, former anthropology representative to the CSSP Student Council Lakan Umali took the initiative to push for the institutionalization of the field school in order to formalize funding from the university.

“Nagkaroon ng dialogue ang League of College Councils with Chancellor Tan where we brought up the institutionalization of funding for Field School,” recalled Umali. He was later advised to approach the Vice Chancellor for Research and Development, who replied that they could not fund undergraduates–only graduate students and faculty members.

Though his efforts did not bear fruit, the current department representative to the CSSP Student Council, Sophie Del Prado, confirmed that the council will still lobby for financial support.

Purnell, on the other hand, still believes that the department should offer their students assistance regardless of the university’s supposed lack of funding for undergraduates, even if only through helping them find groups which can sponsor the field school.

“Just because it’s the norm doesn’t meant that it’s right. We’re trying to push for free education here in this school, and the fact that we have to still pay for stuff that’s part of the education just backfires,” she said.

Philippine Collegian

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